Monday, February 3, 2014

2014 Colorful Kitchen Backsplashes Ideas

Kitchen backsplashes no longer simply protect walls from spills and splatters, a wide array of eye catching materials like glass, wood, metals and stone make the backsplash the focal point of today's kitchens.

You'll love these ideas to try in 2014! I hope you find these ideas useful and inspiring to you .... Enjoy it !!!!


From traditional tile to trendy glass and shiny metal to rustic wood there is seemingly no end of choices for kitchen backsplashes today.Tile is still the most popular backsplash material, with natural stone a fast growing second.


The glass in this blacksplash was chosen to complement art glass pieces in the homeowners' collection. To achieve the look, large sheets of glass were cut into tiles and laid individually.The challenge in working with glass is getting the best colors and control.


Handmade Tile : One of a kind backsplash mosaics can be made of ceramic tile as well. Mosaic artist Vicki Morrow of Tile Art Mosaics in Scottsdale, Arizona, designed and fabricated this backsplash for clients who collect southwestern art.


Copper Tile : Ceramic tiles covered in a thin coating of copper comprise this backsplash by Tami Holsten of Bear Trap Design. Although there is a protective coating on top, says Holsten, "Copper is a living material, so it will naturally patina over time. In my opinion, that just makes it more beautiful." When cleaning copper, she recommends using a pH-balanced cleanser as anything acidic will damage the finish.


Ceramic + Glass Tile : Can't decide between ceramic and glass? This 'Island Star Mosaic' from Porcelanosa's Victorian Collection is a combination of matte porcelain and iridescent glass, which creates subtle changes when it reflects light.


Limestone + Glass Tile : In this kitchen, the mix of materials was created not by a tile manufacturer, but by the designer. Brigitte Fabri, CMKBD, of Drury Designs, wanted to create a "castle wall" effect in this kitchen, without detracting from the room's focal point  the copper hood. For most of the backsplash, she chose a large scale 12x24 'Crema Marfil' limestone because the larger the tile, the fewer distracting grout lines, she explains. And behind the range, she used a honed glass tile called 'Malaga Cove Wings' by Stone & Pewter. To add the illusion of greater height to the 8-foot ceilings, Fabri brought the tile down as close to the range as she could and elongated the niche area all the way up to the hood itself.


Tumbled Stone + Glass Tile : Another gorgeous mixed-media backsplash: Here, glass is mixed with today's popular natural stone. To ensure that this kitchen by Remodelworks looked distinctive, the client installed glass tile behind the range to accent the 4x4 tumbled stone tile that makes up most of the backsplash. Then, interior designer Dixie Lovejoy came up with the idea of turning the tile vertically, so that it looks like a waterfall or rising steam.


Stone: River Rock : Although the most common use of these river rock pebbles is actually shower floors, photo stylist Chris Walker and her husband came up with the idea of using them as a kitchen backsplash. They asked their kitchen designer John Petrie, CMKBD, president elect of the National Kitchen and Bath Association, to install it on the walls. "The one of a kind, free flowing edges of the pebbles not only mimic the flow of soft teal veins in the dark green soapstone countertops," says Walker, "but also balance the vertical lines of the Shaker-style cabinet doors." Lesson learned: when you're shopping for backsplash materials, ask the vendor to show you floor tiles, as well. While not every product will adapt well to vertical application, you may hit upon an unusual and easily implemented idea.


Stone: Quartzite Sandstone : This textured, rustic backsplash makes it look as if this kitchen by Hamilton-Gray Design is fully constructed of stone. But, in fact, the quartzite material actually comes in pieces that are applied just like tile, making it a viable choice even in a home with plaster or sheetrock walls.


Stone: Marble Checkerboard : If you don't find marble tiles in the exact sizes and shapes you want for a backsplash, marble can be custom cut. To bring in some of the lush green landscape beyond the large windows of this home, designer Eileen Kollias, CKD, cut green and white 12-inch marble tiles into 6x6 squares with chamfered edges. The tiles are laid in a harlequin pattern than brings a bit of whimsy into this elegant home, and serves as a dramatic backdrop for prized pieces such as the homeowner's antique coffee grinder/coffee storage cabinet.


Pattern: Brickwork : Familiar as it is, a brickwork tile scheme can look fresh  if the tile itself is eye catching. The kitchen pros at Drury Designs chose this brown subway tile to add contrast to an all white kitchen and to make the space appear larger, because the glass tile reflects light. Running the tile all the way up the wall also adds dimension to the space by drawing the eye upwards.


Unusual Materials: Repurposed Plywood : If you don't want to harvest new wood for your backsplash project, you can take your cue from Karen Swanson of New England Design Works, who had her contractor rip sheets of found plywood into 6-inch wide planks, and install them 3/8" apart on the walls of this kitchen. This resourceful backsplash a modern interpretation of shiplap paneling, Swanson explains is painted with Benjamin Moore Satin Impervo paint, which makes it stand up well in a kitchen. "Painted plywood is not as 'bullet proof' as some other backsplash choices one could make," Swanson concedes. "I would suggest wiping up spills quickly and not allowing standing water next to this but then again, I also suggest that with a tile and grouted backsplash."


Unusual Materials: Chalkboard Paint : If you think all work and no play can make a backsplash dull, there are plenty of ways to bring a light touch into a hardworking kitchen. Here, designer Susan Fredman painted the backsplash with chalkboard paint, which the homeowners can use to keep a recipe handy, write family reminders, or just doodle. The best part? When they want to change the message or clean things up they just wipe the chalkboard clean.

No comments:

Monday, February 3, 2014

2014 Colorful Kitchen Backsplashes Ideas

Kitchen backsplashes no longer simply protect walls from spills and splatters, a wide array of eye catching materials like glass, wood, metals and stone make the backsplash the focal point of today's kitchens.

You'll love these ideas to try in 2014! I hope you find these ideas useful and inspiring to you .... Enjoy it !!!!


From traditional tile to trendy glass and shiny metal to rustic wood there is seemingly no end of choices for kitchen backsplashes today.Tile is still the most popular backsplash material, with natural stone a fast growing second.


The glass in this blacksplash was chosen to complement art glass pieces in the homeowners' collection. To achieve the look, large sheets of glass were cut into tiles and laid individually.The challenge in working with glass is getting the best colors and control.


Handmade Tile : One of a kind backsplash mosaics can be made of ceramic tile as well. Mosaic artist Vicki Morrow of Tile Art Mosaics in Scottsdale, Arizona, designed and fabricated this backsplash for clients who collect southwestern art.


Copper Tile : Ceramic tiles covered in a thin coating of copper comprise this backsplash by Tami Holsten of Bear Trap Design. Although there is a protective coating on top, says Holsten, "Copper is a living material, so it will naturally patina over time. In my opinion, that just makes it more beautiful." When cleaning copper, she recommends using a pH-balanced cleanser as anything acidic will damage the finish.


Ceramic + Glass Tile : Can't decide between ceramic and glass? This 'Island Star Mosaic' from Porcelanosa's Victorian Collection is a combination of matte porcelain and iridescent glass, which creates subtle changes when it reflects light.


Limestone + Glass Tile : In this kitchen, the mix of materials was created not by a tile manufacturer, but by the designer. Brigitte Fabri, CMKBD, of Drury Designs, wanted to create a "castle wall" effect in this kitchen, without detracting from the room's focal point  the copper hood. For most of the backsplash, she chose a large scale 12x24 'Crema Marfil' limestone because the larger the tile, the fewer distracting grout lines, she explains. And behind the range, she used a honed glass tile called 'Malaga Cove Wings' by Stone & Pewter. To add the illusion of greater height to the 8-foot ceilings, Fabri brought the tile down as close to the range as she could and elongated the niche area all the way up to the hood itself.


Tumbled Stone + Glass Tile : Another gorgeous mixed-media backsplash: Here, glass is mixed with today's popular natural stone. To ensure that this kitchen by Remodelworks looked distinctive, the client installed glass tile behind the range to accent the 4x4 tumbled stone tile that makes up most of the backsplash. Then, interior designer Dixie Lovejoy came up with the idea of turning the tile vertically, so that it looks like a waterfall or rising steam.


Stone: River Rock : Although the most common use of these river rock pebbles is actually shower floors, photo stylist Chris Walker and her husband came up with the idea of using them as a kitchen backsplash. They asked their kitchen designer John Petrie, CMKBD, president elect of the National Kitchen and Bath Association, to install it on the walls. "The one of a kind, free flowing edges of the pebbles not only mimic the flow of soft teal veins in the dark green soapstone countertops," says Walker, "but also balance the vertical lines of the Shaker-style cabinet doors." Lesson learned: when you're shopping for backsplash materials, ask the vendor to show you floor tiles, as well. While not every product will adapt well to vertical application, you may hit upon an unusual and easily implemented idea.


Stone: Quartzite Sandstone : This textured, rustic backsplash makes it look as if this kitchen by Hamilton-Gray Design is fully constructed of stone. But, in fact, the quartzite material actually comes in pieces that are applied just like tile, making it a viable choice even in a home with plaster or sheetrock walls.


Stone: Marble Checkerboard : If you don't find marble tiles in the exact sizes and shapes you want for a backsplash, marble can be custom cut. To bring in some of the lush green landscape beyond the large windows of this home, designer Eileen Kollias, CKD, cut green and white 12-inch marble tiles into 6x6 squares with chamfered edges. The tiles are laid in a harlequin pattern than brings a bit of whimsy into this elegant home, and serves as a dramatic backdrop for prized pieces such as the homeowner's antique coffee grinder/coffee storage cabinet.


Pattern: Brickwork : Familiar as it is, a brickwork tile scheme can look fresh  if the tile itself is eye catching. The kitchen pros at Drury Designs chose this brown subway tile to add contrast to an all white kitchen and to make the space appear larger, because the glass tile reflects light. Running the tile all the way up the wall also adds dimension to the space by drawing the eye upwards.


Unusual Materials: Repurposed Plywood : If you don't want to harvest new wood for your backsplash project, you can take your cue from Karen Swanson of New England Design Works, who had her contractor rip sheets of found plywood into 6-inch wide planks, and install them 3/8" apart on the walls of this kitchen. This resourceful backsplash a modern interpretation of shiplap paneling, Swanson explains is painted with Benjamin Moore Satin Impervo paint, which makes it stand up well in a kitchen. "Painted plywood is not as 'bullet proof' as some other backsplash choices one could make," Swanson concedes. "I would suggest wiping up spills quickly and not allowing standing water next to this but then again, I also suggest that with a tile and grouted backsplash."


Unusual Materials: Chalkboard Paint : If you think all work and no play can make a backsplash dull, there are plenty of ways to bring a light touch into a hardworking kitchen. Here, designer Susan Fredman painted the backsplash with chalkboard paint, which the homeowners can use to keep a recipe handy, write family reminders, or just doodle. The best part? When they want to change the message or clean things up they just wipe the chalkboard clean.

No comments:


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Monday, February 3, 2014

2014 Colorful Kitchen Backsplashes Ideas

Kitchen backsplashes no longer simply protect walls from spills and splatters, a wide array of eye catching materials like glass, wood, metals and stone make the backsplash the focal point of today's kitchens.

You'll love these ideas to try in 2014! I hope you find these ideas useful and inspiring to you .... Enjoy it !!!!


From traditional tile to trendy glass and shiny metal to rustic wood there is seemingly no end of choices for kitchen backsplashes today.Tile is still the most popular backsplash material, with natural stone a fast growing second.


The glass in this blacksplash was chosen to complement art glass pieces in the homeowners' collection. To achieve the look, large sheets of glass were cut into tiles and laid individually.The challenge in working with glass is getting the best colors and control.


Handmade Tile : One of a kind backsplash mosaics can be made of ceramic tile as well. Mosaic artist Vicki Morrow of Tile Art Mosaics in Scottsdale, Arizona, designed and fabricated this backsplash for clients who collect southwestern art.


Copper Tile : Ceramic tiles covered in a thin coating of copper comprise this backsplash by Tami Holsten of Bear Trap Design. Although there is a protective coating on top, says Holsten, "Copper is a living material, so it will naturally patina over time. In my opinion, that just makes it more beautiful." When cleaning copper, she recommends using a pH-balanced cleanser as anything acidic will damage the finish.


Ceramic + Glass Tile : Can't decide between ceramic and glass? This 'Island Star Mosaic' from Porcelanosa's Victorian Collection is a combination of matte porcelain and iridescent glass, which creates subtle changes when it reflects light.


Limestone + Glass Tile : In this kitchen, the mix of materials was created not by a tile manufacturer, but by the designer. Brigitte Fabri, CMKBD, of Drury Designs, wanted to create a "castle wall" effect in this kitchen, without detracting from the room's focal point  the copper hood. For most of the backsplash, she chose a large scale 12x24 'Crema Marfil' limestone because the larger the tile, the fewer distracting grout lines, she explains. And behind the range, she used a honed glass tile called 'Malaga Cove Wings' by Stone & Pewter. To add the illusion of greater height to the 8-foot ceilings, Fabri brought the tile down as close to the range as she could and elongated the niche area all the way up to the hood itself.


Tumbled Stone + Glass Tile : Another gorgeous mixed-media backsplash: Here, glass is mixed with today's popular natural stone. To ensure that this kitchen by Remodelworks looked distinctive, the client installed glass tile behind the range to accent the 4x4 tumbled stone tile that makes up most of the backsplash. Then, interior designer Dixie Lovejoy came up with the idea of turning the tile vertically, so that it looks like a waterfall or rising steam.


Stone: River Rock : Although the most common use of these river rock pebbles is actually shower floors, photo stylist Chris Walker and her husband came up with the idea of using them as a kitchen backsplash. They asked their kitchen designer John Petrie, CMKBD, president elect of the National Kitchen and Bath Association, to install it on the walls. "The one of a kind, free flowing edges of the pebbles not only mimic the flow of soft teal veins in the dark green soapstone countertops," says Walker, "but also balance the vertical lines of the Shaker-style cabinet doors." Lesson learned: when you're shopping for backsplash materials, ask the vendor to show you floor tiles, as well. While not every product will adapt well to vertical application, you may hit upon an unusual and easily implemented idea.


Stone: Quartzite Sandstone : This textured, rustic backsplash makes it look as if this kitchen by Hamilton-Gray Design is fully constructed of stone. But, in fact, the quartzite material actually comes in pieces that are applied just like tile, making it a viable choice even in a home with plaster or sheetrock walls.


Stone: Marble Checkerboard : If you don't find marble tiles in the exact sizes and shapes you want for a backsplash, marble can be custom cut. To bring in some of the lush green landscape beyond the large windows of this home, designer Eileen Kollias, CKD, cut green and white 12-inch marble tiles into 6x6 squares with chamfered edges. The tiles are laid in a harlequin pattern than brings a bit of whimsy into this elegant home, and serves as a dramatic backdrop for prized pieces such as the homeowner's antique coffee grinder/coffee storage cabinet.


Pattern: Brickwork : Familiar as it is, a brickwork tile scheme can look fresh  if the tile itself is eye catching. The kitchen pros at Drury Designs chose this brown subway tile to add contrast to an all white kitchen and to make the space appear larger, because the glass tile reflects light. Running the tile all the way up the wall also adds dimension to the space by drawing the eye upwards.


Unusual Materials: Repurposed Plywood : If you don't want to harvest new wood for your backsplash project, you can take your cue from Karen Swanson of New England Design Works, who had her contractor rip sheets of found plywood into 6-inch wide planks, and install them 3/8" apart on the walls of this kitchen. This resourceful backsplash a modern interpretation of shiplap paneling, Swanson explains is painted with Benjamin Moore Satin Impervo paint, which makes it stand up well in a kitchen. "Painted plywood is not as 'bullet proof' as some other backsplash choices one could make," Swanson concedes. "I would suggest wiping up spills quickly and not allowing standing water next to this but then again, I also suggest that with a tile and grouted backsplash."


Unusual Materials: Chalkboard Paint : If you think all work and no play can make a backsplash dull, there are plenty of ways to bring a light touch into a hardworking kitchen. Here, designer Susan Fredman painted the backsplash with chalkboard paint, which the homeowners can use to keep a recipe handy, write family reminders, or just doodle. The best part? When they want to change the message or clean things up they just wipe the chalkboard clean.

No comments: